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Internet dating survey

Interestingly, the majority of Australians find it hard to identify scammers (56 percent) and nearly 60 percent of Australians would like website/app owners to take more ownership for protecting them from the dangers of online dating.

Compared with older groups, particularly Americans ages 50 or older, Millennials are significantly more likely to be accepting of interracial marriage.

While 85% of Millennials say they would be fine with a marriage to someone from any of the groups asked about, that number drops to about three-quarters (73%) among 30-to-49-year-olds, 55% among 50-to-64-year-olds, and just 38% of those ages 65 and older.

According to the Consumer Reports 2016 Online Dating Survey of more than 114,000 subscribers, among the respondents who were considering online dating but were hesitant, 46 percent said they were concerned about being scammed. “Typically the scammer builds trust by writing long letters over weeks or months and crafting a whole persona for their victims,” says Unit Chief David Farquhar from the Financial Crimes Section of the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) who specializes in cyber-related crimes.

These people will have dates on a regular basis, and they may or may not be having sexual relations.

Many online daters who have had negative experiences (46 percent) simply choose to ignore them.

However, of those who take action, many choose to block messages (36 percent) or stop using the dating website or application altogether (35 percent).

From the standpoint of anthropology and sociology, dating is linked with other institutions such as marriage and the family which have also been changing rapidly and which have been subject to many forces, including advances in technology and medicine.